Kirkpatrick helps break down why today’s defensive backs aren’t grinding out interceptions at the same rate as NFL players in the 20th century.

I mean, my guy’s got Demon as a qualifier in his name. Right off the bat, not a great look. And like the Providence Friar above, his soulless, black eyes, oversized chin and smug face suggest something sinister bubbling just underneath the surface. In fact, he’s always kind of reminded me of someone with similar qualities…

So which mascot do you not trust? Which one haunts your dreams? Which one do you think DEFINITELY has a collection of fingers stashed in a nondescript box under his bed? Let us know in the comments — if you’re not too scared.

After Newman, the next active player on the list is Reggie http://www.newnfljerseyscheap.com/ Nelson, tied for 116th in all-time interceptions for his 36 takeaways. Newman started his career in Jacksonville where he had seven interceptions in three seasons. He then moved onto the Bengals where he accumulated 23 interceptions in six years and, most recently, he joined the Raiders where he’s nabbed six interceptions in two years. Nelson is now 34 and is signed to a one-year contract with the Raiders this season. Like Newman, his chances of meaningfully climbing up the list are not great.

And that has efficiency consequences due to imperfect incentives.

College coaches are tasked with winning games. If they produce NFL players, great, but that is not the primary goal.

So they recruit to that goal. Players are only in the college system for four years; three if they’re elite. That’s a very small amount of time to develop a player, particularly if he is raw.

Recruiting a player whom a program might need to spend three years developing — just to have a potential of one year of good play — is not going to be a winning formula. cheap nfl jerseys Knowing that, colleges must manage risk and balance prospects with floor and those with ceiling. And that floor is likely going to be altered by some players receiving private QB coaching outside of what is available at a typical high school.

But if the NFL had its own minor league system, instead of relying on colleges, its future prospects would be in programs fully focused on player development, instead of winning games.

If the NFL had a minor-league system, it could take its time to develop a raw, toolsy high school QB who likely wouldn’t be ready to make a difference in college, but who could, after six or seven years in the minor leagues, be ready for the NFL.

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